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Full text of "The College greetings"

The COLLEGE 
GREETINGS 




NOVEMBER- 1915 



X5fa (Tolle^e (BrteUngs 

The College Greetings is published monthly by the stu- 
dents of Illinois Woman's College. 

Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students 
of all departments, and from the alumnae. They are due the 
fifteenth of each month. 

Subscriptions, $1.00 a year, payable in advance. Single 
copies 15c. 

Entered at Jacksonville Postoffice as second class matter. 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Founders' Day Picture 2 

Editorial 3 

Russia's Gift to the World 5 

That Terrible Question 7 

Founders' Day 8 

At Lake Matanzas 9 

The Nature of a Sandbur 12 

Those Privileges! 13 

Seniors 14 

Illiwoco 15 

Sophomore — My Arrival at I. W. C. 16 

Fourth Academy Notes — Annual Meeting at Danville 17 

Students' Association — Y. W. C. A. 18 

Belles Lettres 19 

Theta Sigma— Phi Nu 20 

Lambda Mu 21 

Academea — Locals 22 

The Freshman Muse — Art Notes 24 

Alumnae Notes 25 

Glee Club Notes 26 

Short Story Contest — Service Circle 27 

Jokes 28 



.founders' JDa? 




'^Tjr 



Ciu College Greetings 



Vol. XIX. Jacksonville, 111., November, 1915. No. 2. 



Faculty Adviser — Miss Jennie Anderson. 

Editor-in-chief — Ruth Want. 

Associate and Alumnae Editor — Alma Harmel. 

Assistant Editors — Norma Perbix, Margaret Slatten. 

Art Editor — Ruth Patton. 

Business Manager — Ruth Taylor. 

Assistant Business Managers — Phyllis Wilkinson, Ila Allen. 



Editorial 



The average college girl is passing through a period 
of reconstruction in her thought life. Accordingly, she 
resents perhaps more than at any other time, the inter- 
vention of any outside restraint that might tend to 
withhold her from pursuing her own course in her own 
way. She has little patience with rules, however harm- 
less they may be, and is openly antagonistic to any re- 
striction that blocks her in the pursuit of her present 
caprice. She does not recognize in discipline, that ele- 
ment of restraint which always constitutes part of the 
charm of a well-poised character. Nor does she realize 
that the very fact that such a principle of conduct as 
the rule contains, has been accepted long enough to al- 
low it to slip into custom and finally into defined regu- 
lation, marks it of some merit and worthy of respect. 
But we can do more than boast that the rules of our 
college life have stood the test of years ; we can point 

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Tb\)t College ©reelings 



out that the principles upon which they are founded 
are sane and practical. For instance, experience 
showed that students do their best work when they 
have sufficient sleep and regular hours, but that they 
seldom do have them of their own accord. Hence we 
have our household rules on lights, and attendance at 
meals is made compulsory. Similarly, it has often been 
shown that some students are not considerate, and all 
students need to be reminded of duty at times ; so reg- 
ular study hours and rules for quiet are part of the 
regime. In like manner other bits of practical experi- 
ence have become a part of custom until it has been 
considered expedient to put them all into tangible form. 
Consequently a book has been made which is none other 
than our "Little Brown Book." 

In the light of its origin, the little handbook is cer- 
tainly deserving of a thoughtful reading. And if we 
read it with understanding we shall no doubt, discover 
that its contents are not only of temporary significance. 
The "Spirit of Honor, Mutual Help, and Self -respect" 
that reflects thruout its pages, is the secret of all com- 
munity living. If we follow its guidance in college 
days, we may early learn the art of being a pleasant as- 
sociate and save ourselves many of the punishments of 
that famous old disciplinarian, the World. 



t 



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T5\)£ College i&reetings 



RUSSIA'S GIFT TO THE WORLD 

J. W. Mackail 



Formerly, Russia was entirely unknown to Eng- 
lishmen, but since the beginning of the present war in 
Europe, they have come to consider her as a neighbor 
and an ally. During the last century, Russia has con- 
tributed her share to the progress of the world and 
to the enrichment of life, in letters, art, and science. 
It is to give to Englishmen a better knowledge of Rus- 
sian art, literature, and science, that J. W. Mackail has 
written, "Russia's Gift to the World." 

Russian literature is divided into two parts. The 
first division consists of the early ballads, folk-lore, and 
tales, which have been handed down from generation 
to generation. In modern times, Danilev, Rybnikov 
and Sakharov have collected these old fairy tales. The 
second division consists of the more modern Russian 
literature. At first, books were written in the French 
style, which dominated Europe during the eighteenth 
century, but, by the national war of 1812, a great im- 
pulse was given to Russian literature. The first work 
to inspire an interest among the educated classes was 
a history of their own country, which was written by 
Karamzin. Pushkin, both a poet and a prose writer of 
the romantic school, was the founder of the modern 
Russian literature. 

Turgenev, Dostoyevsky and Tolstoy are acknow- 
ledged as among the greatest writers of all ages and 
countries. Turgenev represents Russia of older times. 
In his writings he combines truth and nature with 
complete harmony between thought and expression. 
Dostoyevsky represents the growth and unrest of the 
new democracy. In his passion for humanity he por- 

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I3!)e College Greetings 



trays scenes of poverty and suffering. The name and 
works of Tolstoy are known everywhere. He created 
people and situations that are life itself. In his love 
for Russia, in his love for humanity, he draws his pic- 
tures from the Russian peasantry. There are many 
more minor writers but these three tower high above 
them. 

While literature was developing, music, the 
natural gift of the Slavonic race, was coming into its 
own. The influence of Italian composers, who came to 
Russia in the eighteenth century, caused a decline in 
native Russian music. It was revived, however, by 
Glinka, a contemporary of the writer Pushkin. Rubin- 
stein and Tschaikowsky are the best known of Russian 
composers, yet their work is not distinctively Russian 
but shows a western influence. True Russian music 
was composed by Mussoegsky, Borodin, and Rimsky- 
Koesagov, composers, who are remarkable for their 
clear direct vision. 

During the middle ages, Russia was so poor and 
so oppressed by foreign invaders that she could not do 
her share in the development of art. Then, too, the 
Russian church disapproved of sculpture and painting. 
In fact, great Russian painters do not belong to a Rus- 
sian, but rather to a European movement. 

The first theatre to be erected in Russia was 
opened in 1703 but native Russian drama did not defin- 
itely begin until 1831, the year in which one of 
Pushkin's tragedies was produced. Both Turgenev 
and Tolstoy wrote plays. At the Moscow Arts Theatre 
acting is taken as a serious art. A play which is poorly 
staged and acted is never shown before the public. 

It has been during the last fifty years that Russia 
has given her gift to the world in the sphere of science. 
She has produced pioneers who have opened new lines 

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*C>l)e College <&reetitt$s 



of thought and have entered new realms of the un- 
known. Her mathematicians have done work in dif- 
ferential equations, analysis, and the theory of 
numbers. Russian physicists have performed most 
difficult experiments. Ever since Peter the Great built 
the Observatory at Petrograd, Russia has taken an 
interest in astronomy. In the various fields of science, 
Russia is represented by competent scientists. 

Considering that Russian government was organ- 
ized later than the governments of other great Euro- 
pean powers, Russia's gift to the world in letters, art, 
and science, during the past century, has indeed been 
great. 

Norma Perbix, '17. 

• 
THAT TERRIBLE QUESTION 



I was worried. In fact I had worried so long and 
so hard that I had given up all hope of ever answering 
the bothersome question. It was before me constantly, 
every moment of the day, and it haunted my dreams 
at night. My face was growing haggard and pale, and 
the black shadows began to deepen under my eyes, and 
all because of that terrible question. I could not live 
peacefully, I could not die happily, until I had answered 
it. 

It was this : "Why does a dog turn around three 
times before he lies down?" Why wouldn't once be 
enough ? Or twice ? 

Time went on, and no answer came. Still the 
question kept running thru my brain like a little engine. 

One evening when I was sitting alone in the lib- 
rary, I chanced to glance idly at the shelf in the corner. 

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On it was a single lonely motto. I jumped up and 
screamed for sheer joy. The question was answered, 
and my life was saved! The motto read: "One good 
turn deserves another/' 

Zay Wright '19. 

$ 

FOUNDERS' DAY 



The seventh Founders' Day of Illinois Woman's 
College was observed Friday, October fifteenth. The 
Commemoration Service, held in Music Hall at ten 
o'clock, was one that did great honor to the early 
founders of the college. The Hon. Lawrence Y .Sher- 
man gave the address of the day, in which he took us 
back to the time in which Peter Cartwright, Judge 
Brown, Peter Akers and others of these early pioneers 
lived and made us acquainted with them in their own 
frontier homes. From incidents which he gave, we 
were able to see what men of character, vision, pur- 
pose, and determination they were. He also pointed 
out to us the responsibility of Woman's College girls 
in helping to solve the great problems of the day, es- 
pecially that of the immigrant which this country is 
facing. 

Mrs. Susie Finley Brown Dillon '75 presented a 
portrait of her father, the Hon. William Brown, who 
was a member of the board of trustees appointed in 
1846 to establish the college, and who served in that 
capacity for many years. 

We were very happy to welcome Mrs. Alice Mc- 
Elroy Griffith at Springfield, the oldest living graduate 
of the college. As she spoke to us she was attended by 
five girls who represented in costume her classmates of 
1852. 

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Before the College Luncheon was served on the 
campus to the visiting friends, faculty and students, all 
assembled for a picture. At two o"clock in the old 
chapel, a conference concerning the present needs and 
future welfare of the college was held. Especially to 
the students, this meeting was very inspiring as it gave 
them a glimpse into the heart of the college which 
made them sing with a new meaning, 

"0, College dear, we love but thee, 
And will be always true." 

The concert at eight o'clock in Music Hall given by 
the members of the faculty of the College of Music was 
a rare treat that very fittingly ended the best 
Founders' Day of Illinois Woman's College. 

Ola Wendel, '16. 




k A* 
AT LAKE MANTANZAS 



"Where's Edna? She has all the Senior tickets. 
Well, thank goodness, such a relief!" 

The train with forty juniors and seniors and class 
advisers bad started for Lake Matanzas. 

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T3I)e College (Greeting* 



"Are we all here?" 

"Yes — no, where's Phyllis? Oh, girls, look down 
the street!" 

There, two blocks away, came Phyllis. 

"Well, it's too late now. We can't afford to pull 
the air brake even for Phyllis. Costs a dollar, you 
know." 

A few blocks farther on, the train slackened speed, 
an automobile backed away from the track, and we 
received Phyllis into our midst with "Who was he? 
When did you go into the movie business? How did 
you do it?" 

It took but a short time to reach the sign post 
which read "Lake Matanzas." A wild rush for the 
baggage car resulted in a careful backing away. 

"What's the matter, Grace?" 

"Ouch, the sand burs. I'm all stuck up. Don't 
dare move." 

At last, the procession started for the cottages, 
with the four senior cooks riding in state on top of 
trunks, provisions, suitcases, and even five-gallon water 
bottles. (No typhoid germs allowed.) 

Had one asked the reason for the serious faces at 
six o'clock that night, the answer would have been, 
"the meat." Oh, it was very good meat. The only 
thing wrong with it was that it had remained in Jack- 
sonville. Five dozen eggs solved the difficulty for sup- 
per and breakfast in the junior and senior camps, al- 
though the seniors often wonder why, when only 
twenty eggs were given to the juniors, thirty-seven 
were cooked for their breakfast. 

Midnight came. Lights were out. Then, from the 
junior cottage advanced a chorus of voices singing, 

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*&{)& College (Breetln^s 



"By Stately Elms Surrounded," and halted by the 
senior porch. 

"Mary, can you see over the side if the seniors got 
up ? They ought to for the college song." 

Then the senior challenge came in song, "Oh, say 
Can You See?" 

Betty, who had behaved nicely until now, was 
aroused by the serenade and insisted upon singing 
"Good Night, Ladies." 

" 'Merrily we roll along/ Quit shaking straw in 
my face.' " 

"Well, sing something different then." 
"Three blind mice, see how they run!" 
"I want something peaceful so I can go to sleep." 
"That's awfully pieceful when you come to 'She 
cut them in two with the carving knife/ " 

Silence reigned for two minutes. Then, from the 
lower berth of the "double decker" came "This is the 
last time in this bunk for us. We don't like the hay. 
You keep still up there. You're sending all your mat- 
tress down to us. We both have hay fever already." 

Sunday arrived, and with it the doleful lament of 
the juniors "Too much mosquito bite." The rides on 
the lake and the good Sunday dinner soon drove such 
trivial matters out of the minds of all. It rained, but 
that mattered little. Even chickens can be picked 
under an umbrella, Miss McLaughlin says. 

Three new friendships were formed on Sunday, 
Clarence, the dog; Isabell, the cat, and Aaron, the 
snake. We will not mention Napoleon. Isabell, espec- 
ially, gained the love of the juniors by running the 
marathon over their mattresses at night. 

With Monday came the launch ride to Havanna. 

Page Eleven 



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There it was that temptation overcame us. We im- 
bibed some germs in the Havanna restaurant. 

Evening arrived all too soon. Good bye was said 
to Clarence, Isabel and Amos, the mosquito, who came 
to the station with us; and the forty unsunburned 
campers boarded the train for Jacksonville. 

Mae Blackburn, '16. 

ۤ 

THE NATURE OF A SANDBUR 

By one who has had experience 



Some inexperienced people may consider a sandbur 
a small object of no consequence, but in Matanzas one 
little specimen alone seemed to be able to start a good 
many things, which to those affected at least, seemed 
very real indeed. If that basket of apples had not been 
thrown into a patch of sandburrs, we should have had 
the courage to lift the canvas cover and discover in 
time that the contents were not meat. In which case 
it would not have been necessary to go to the farm- 
house for eggs for supper, and then the feud between 
the seniors and juniors would not have started. Fur- 
thermore, if the sandburs had not annoyed the girls 
in the boats to such an extent that they felt they had 
to part with them, Miss Anderson would not have wor- 
ried lest her young charges capsize because of, what 
to her on the shore must have looked like, gymnastic 
exercises in the boats. Sometimes a sandbur has the 
tendency to light gently on its victim in the manner 
of a mosquito (of which, as has been mentioned, there 
were plenty). Whereupon the object of attack would 
raise her hand stealthily and let it sink firmly on what 
one thought a destructible mosquito, the result — "pure 
sensation." 

Margaret Goldsmith, '16. 
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THOSE PRIVILEGES! 



A Senior! Yes, and all the privileges that were 
extended with that most honored title are now the 
highly prized property of the twenty-one members of 
the class of 1916. 

Such a commotion as does occur when one of the 
number is in the furthermost corner of the elevator. 
Why should the senior be the one to precede in the line 
of march to the classroom when she already has the 
"privilege" of occupying the middle seat of the front 
row of chairs? is the question in the underclassmen's 
mind. 

And the joys of wearing the caps and gowns ! Of 
course, we should be satisfied, and wear them twice a 
week since all look so beautiful thus garmented (every- 
one says so), but some think, yes, know, that low col- 
lars and 'figure eights' on the top of the head are much 
more comfortable than collar stays poking sensitive 
spots, and a style of low hair dress. 

But my! Aren't we glad that we can go out to 
luncheon or visit the confectioners any time of the day 
until nine thirty P. M. ? We all delight in being ac- 
costed with "Oh, you're a senior, you can get us some- 
thing to eat at nine o'clock. Won't you, please?" If 
only our garbs of distinction had not emptied our 
purses we might be seen drifting into Ehnie's oftener. 

If there is a sixteener anywhere in I. W. C. who 
hasn't learned to edge her way out of morning chapel, 
will she please hand her name to the College Greet- 
ings? The Seniors will be very glad when the Fresh- 
men of today can know the pleasure of having to go 
early in order to get down to the front rows before the 
doxology is begun, then to strain the neck in order to 

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see Dr. Harker and the faculty, and finally, the great 
joy of having the ten thirty class bell ring before there 
has been any sign of a chance to see if the second mail 
has brought any cheering missives from friends. 

Another privilege we delight in is the one to have 
callers and accept invitations to go riding with friends. 
Any or all seniors would be delighted to take advantage 
of such a 'per' if only there were relatives, friends or 
even men in this town to extend them, but sad to relate, 
all such classes are few. 

But we are not complaining. We are more than 
glad for all favors. How long have we not looked with 
longing eyes at those front chapel seats, and those 
after dinner walks, and those glorious serge caps and 
gowns that make all others pay due respect to the 
wearers! We are duly thankful for the opportunity 
of mailing letters at the post office in the evening in- 
stead of having to scramble for stamps before 7 A. M. 
Light pers are the most blessed of all gifts, and we are 
grateful for them. As for lingering in the chapel, we 
should not wish to hasten away, for it will be but a 
very short time until we can not longer appear there in 
those first four rows. 

Remember, underclassmen, we were in your places 
once, and can appreciate your sacrifices. We can only 
express our gratitude to all by saying merely "Thank 
you." 

Alma Harmel, '16. 

SENIORS 



On October fourteenth the Senior Class was form- 
ally recognized at chapel. After the procession, in 
which the Seniors appeared for the first time in cap 

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and gown, the class song "0 Love that Wilt Not Let Me 
Go" was sung. Mrs. Hartman then delighted her audi- 
ence with a solo, Kipling's "Recessional," after which 
Dr. Harker gave a short talk. He advised the Seniors 
to prepare themselves to be examples for others in as 
many ways as possible. He also told the students that 
his ideal was for them to be womanly women, and then 
he mentioned a number of opportunities for women to 
show their character after they had finished their col- 
lege career. 

The class of 1916 missed one of their number, 
Ruth Taylor, very much the last few weeks. Miss Tay- 
lor has been kept out of school because of illness. 



ILLIWOCO 



With the opening of school, the Juniors started 
serious work upon the annual. The rest of the staff 
members were elected, making the board of editors 
complete. 

Editor-in-chief, Georgia Humberd. 

Associate editors, Phyllis Wilkinson, Johanna 
Onkin. 

Business Manager, Mary Harrison. 

Assistant Business Manager, Anna Floreth. 

Senior Representative, Edna Robb. 

We wish to call your attention to the snap shot 
contest. Girls, it's worth while! Remember the con- 
test closes December first. Your pictures will be re- 
turned to you at the end of the year. The winner will 
get one third off her annual and receive especial recog- 
nition in the book. This is surely a strong inducement 
to hand in your six best snap shots. 

Page Fifteen 



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SOPHOMORE. 



A most delightful evening was enjoyed on Satur- 
day, October second, when the Sophomores entertained 
the Freshmen at a "kid" party. At eight o'clock the 
sophomore boys were seen escorting their best girls to 
Expression Hall, where they indulged in "kid" games 
during the evening. The Freshmen showed much or- 
iginality in their cleverly devised dresses and bonnets. 
After feasting on ice cream cones and stick candy, the 
children formed small groups and had their pictures 
taken. The party was happily ended by a grand 
march. 

MY ARRIVAL AT I. W. C. 

By Ruth Harker 



Strangely enough, I do not remember the first 
impression Illinois Women's College made upon me, but 
several people seem to remember the first impression I 
made upon the College, and I will relate it to you as it 
has been told to me. 

Unlike most new girls, I entered these halls in May 
instead of September. There was not the usual rush 
and excitement but everything was still. The reason 
for this was that it was Sunday and the faculty were 
attending Baccalaureate service. It must have been 
that my pride was hurt at so quiet a welcome, because 
it could hardly be that I was homesick, but I wept, and 
not only wept, but howled. However, when the church 
services were over and the people returned, I am told 
that no new girl ever received such a welcome as did I. 
I was quite the center of attraction and several even 
went so far as to present me with gifts. Of course 
everyone asked me my name, and when I gave no an- 

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swer, only cried louder and harder, they concluded that 
I had none and so the Senior graduating class bestowed 
the name Ruth upon me. 

FOURTH ACADEMY NOTES. 



We old girls are glad to be together again, and we 
welcome our five new members. There are twenty 
two in the fourth academy this year and with such a 
large class, full of enthusiasm for work and play, we 
expect this year to be one of success and accomplish- 
ment. At the very first of the class of '16 was a prom- 
inent figure in the academy, and ever since it has 
shown a great interest in everything. We are earnest- 
ly striving to uphold not only the fourth, but the entire 
academy, and as leader of it we shall try to make this 
year the best we have ever had. 

We are very glad to have Miss Washburne as our 
class advisor and we had a delightful little luncheon in 
the cookerei Wednesday night in her honor. Our class 
election on the sixth of October resulted as follows : 

President — Mildred Barton. 

Vice President — Agnes Bright. 

Secretary and Treasurer — Hazel Shepherd. 

Class Reporter — Frances Sconce. 

* 
ANNUAL MEETING AT DANVILLE 



The State Association for the Prevention of Tuber- 
culosis convened at Danville, October Twenty-third. 
Miss Olmstead and Miss A. L. Adams, of Jacksonville, 
were speakers on the program. Practical ways and 
means of meeting the white plague were discussed 
thruout the Conference. 

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X3!?e College ©reelings 



STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION 



The annual sing came a little late this year, be- 
cause of the early flight to Matanzas of the senior and 
junior songsters. Possibly this lateness only gave a 
bigger opportunity for both the manufacture and un- 
derstanding of local hits. At any rate the song in 
honor of the faculty, the Matanzas chorus, and the 
snappy new college songs were greatly enjoyed. Many 
learned our "Beloved College of Women, Our College," 
and a large number were shown how "By Stately Elms 
Surrounded" should be sung by an I. W. C. girl. 

The students shared in the conference on the 
"Future of Illinois Womans' College and its Present 
Needs," on Founders' Day. The student president 
spoke of the "Present Needs," from a student point of 
view. At this meeting the girls found that their more 
or less fragmentary views of college gave way, because 
a larger perspective, to a fuller vision of the college as a 
whole. 



Y. W. C. A. NOTES 



The recognition service for the new girls was held 
October 10th. 

There are two new cabinet members, Olive Ger- 
rick, who is mission study chairman, and Maud Stru- 
binger, who is chairman of systematic giving. The 
Jubilee committee, consisting of Mary Fowler, Ila 
Allen, Miriam Anderson, Romaine Loar and Gertrude 
Wilson, has been appointed. This Jubilee is to be a 
great celebration during the month of February, of the 
fiftieth anniversary of the Y. W. C. A. Begin now to 

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think about it and to plan about it, for the committee 
will want your suggestions. 

The past month has been an important one for the 
Y. W. C. A. During this time ninety-five girls have 
decided to become members of a great world-wide or- 
ganization. The majority of these new girls have had 
their first introduction to Y. W. C. A. since they came 
to college. It is now up to the old girls to prove to 
these new members just what a vital and interesting 
work they have come into. There is just a little hint 
to these new girls that might be helpful — Decide right 
now that you are going to put a great deal into Y. W. 
C. A. for it is just the amount that you put into it that 
you will get from it. 



BELLES LETTRES. 



In our work this year a most interesting course on 
the great masters of today in music, art, drama and 
social work has been planned. Our occasional extem- 
poraneous programs display the impromptu talents of 
our members. The juniors and seniors have already 
starred when they told of their Matanzas experiences. 

We, as well as the College, felt very much honored 
to have Mrs. McElroy Griffith, mother of Mrs. Pitner, 
with us on Founder's Day. Mrs. Griffith is the only 
living charter member of Belles Lettres and she is still 
very much interested in all of its work. She lives in 
Springfield. 

Our annual vagabond picnic has not passed into 
oblivion but because of the rains and other things it 
has been postponed several times. However, we are 
still looking forward to it with much anxiety and en- 
thusiasm. 

Page Nineteen 



13f)£ College <&reetittgs 



We are all glad to know that Ruth Taylor and 
Gertrude Wilson who are home on account of illness 
are improving and will soon be with us again. 



THETA SIGMA 



Our work for this year is proving to be quite in- 
structive as well as interesting. 

Louise Harries, '15, sent us a beautiful copy of 
Carot's picture "The Dance of the Wood Nymphs." 
That day was our lucky one, for our new Theta Sigma 
skin was hung in the hall on the same day. 

Several of our former members have taken the 
matrimonial leap. Ruth Clements was married June 
15th to Mr. John Barnhill Jr., of Crawfordsville, Ind. 
We received an announcement of Ruth Pinkston's mar- 
riage to Mr. R. V. Bickers, of Jonesboro, Ark., on Sept- 
ember 29th. 

Grace Roberts, one of our charter members, was 
over one day last week. She is teaching in Franklin 
this year. 

Hazel Hamilton of Beardstown was a visitor over 
Founders' Day. 



PHI NU. 



Founder's Day is always a day of great rejoicing 
to us, as it brings back so many of our old girls. We 
were also glad to have Senator Sherman with us in our 
hall and to many of the old Phi Nu's it brought back 

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<E3l)e College (BrceUngs 



memories of Mrs. Sherman, who was such a strong 
member of our society in 1904. Mrs. Orr and Mrs. 
Dillon were among our alumnae, both having been Phi 
Nu presidents in the Senior year. Mrs. Roy Seymour 
of Danville spent the week end here, a representative 
of Phi Nu in 1900. 

Our old girls in Jacksonville planned a meeting for 
Tuesday, October twenty-sixth, of all old girls in the 
surrounding neighborhood. We especially appreciated 
this meeting as it made us feel keenly that 

"Our bond shall ne'er be broken 
Though severed by land and sea." 



LAMBDA MU. 



Lambda Alpha Mu was at home to the incoming 
students of the college, at a reception given at the Co- 
lonial Inn on Saturday evening, October the sixteenth. 
Selections by the Hitte orchestra, together with special 
instrumental numbers by Edith Brown and a solo by 
Elisabeth Witbeck comprised the music of the evening. 
We were pleased to have also as our guests of the even- 
ing, Mrs. Harker, Miss Mothershead, Miss Neville, Mrs. 
Ellis and Mrs. Moellering. The color scheme was suc- 
cessfully carried out with the society colors, lavender 
and white, and its flower, the pink Killarney rose. 

Miss Naomi Davis, one of our former members, 
read at the reunion of the alumnae and former I. W. C. 
students held at Kansas City, Missouri, October the 
fifteenth. 

Page Twenty-one 



*&\)t College C&reeUngs 



ACADEMEA 



Twenty of Academea's members are back to enjoy 
another year, which we hope will be one of more prog- 
ress than ever. We are glad to have Nell Rives, an old 
member, with us again. At our open meeting, October 
twelfth, a most interesting program was given. After- 
wards we spent the time getting acquainted with the 
new girls. 



LOCALS. 



Thursday morning, October 7, the birthday of 
James Whitcomb Riley, was fittingly observed in 
chapel. Lavina Jones read "An Old Sweetheart of 
Mine," and Frances Smith read "Knee Deep in June." 
That evening the Indiana girls paid due respect to the 
poet, who has brought such fame to their state, by hav- 
ing special tables in the dining room. 

The town girls had a very delightful open house at 
the Strawn home on West State, Monday, Oct. 11. The 
decorations were very effective, and the guests thor- 
oughly enjoyed themselves. This property was recent- 
ly acquired by the College thru the generosity of Dr. 
David Strawn. 

Dr. Harker has given two out of a series of chapel 
talks on "How to Get What You Want." They have 
proved very interesting and profitable and we are 
eagerly awaiting the other number of the series. 

Mrs. Belle Short Lambert has just presented to the 
College library six volumes of Appleton's Encyclopedia 
of American Biography. 

Page Twenty-two 



'Glje College ©reelings 



Dates of Interest to the Essay Writers are as fol- 
lows : 

First draft of manuscript must be in not later than 
Nov. 15. 

Second draft must be in not later than Nov. 29. 

Typewritten copies must be in not later than 
Dec. 8. 

Mrs. Pendleton of Quincy spent Wed. Oct. 1 here 
with her daughter Miriam. 

Miss Blackburn, who has spent many years in the 
mission work in Bulgaria gave a very interesting talk 
on the conditions in Bulgaria during the Balkan wars 
and also about the Boarding school in Lovetch. 

The 3rd prep, class had a lively picnic breakfast at 
Nichols Park, Friday morning, October the fifteenth. 
They have also organized and elected these officers : 

President — Marion Jane Robison. 
Vice President — Eloise Capps. 
Secretary and Treasurer — Jessie Wall. 

Mrs Lambert is attending the meeting of the Chi- 
cago Association. This association is quite aggressive 
and new members are being added constantly. 

Mr. Harvey Sconce, one of the trustees, and his 
wife spent Founder's Day at the College with their 
daughter, Frances. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Slatten motored to Jackson- 
ville Sunday, Oct. 10, from Taylorville and spent the 
day with Margaret. 

The first meeting of the Domestic Science Club was 

Page Twenty-three 



Z3t)£ College Greetings 



held Friday afternoon, October 7. Very interesting 
discussions were given on State and National Exten- 
sion work. We were glad to have so many new girls at 
the meeting and hope that they will continue to be in- 
terested thruout the year. 

All of the girls who attend Grace Methodist 
church were royally entertained Sunday, Oct. 17, at 
the homes of the members. We were all especially 
glad to get better acquainted with these town friends 
of ours and we should all try to show our appreciation 
by becoming interested in the church and its work and 
by attending regularly. 



THE FRESHMAN MUSE. 



The new Freshman class of 1919. 

Have burdened their poor little brains 
With stiff regulations and rules without end 

And manners that add to their pains. 

But in spite of all this they're a real lively class, 

With eighty-five members or more! 
We intend to row steadily onward this year; 

Mrs. Ellis will manage our oar. 

The other our president handles with skill 

Until smoothly and swiftly we glide 
Through the four years of work, of enjoyment, and fun; 

With the blue and the white floating wide. 



ART NOTES 



Sarah May was recently awarded six first and six 
second prizes at the Western Montana State Fair. The 
work receiving recognition was done in the studio last 
year and included studies in oil, water color, charcoal 

Page Twenty-four 



X3I)£ College <Breetin<js 



work from the cast, and two pieces of decorated china. 

No two hour sketches have been made this year in 
sketch class, but there have been a number of inter- 
esting one hour poses. This month the girls who posed 
were Grace Lees, Dorothy Crawley, Romaine Loar, 
Phyllis Wilkinson and Adelaide Feris. Beulah Erick- 
son has joined the sketch class this year. 

ALUMNAE NOTES. 

Miss Susan Rebhan, of the class of 1905, is in the 
National Training School in New York. She will spend 
a year there in preparing to become a national secre- 
tary. 

We have heard of the marriage of Faye Boone on 
Oct. 6, to Mr. Wm. Pogenpole, a jeweler in Champaign, 
Illinois. 

Another marriage which took place last week is 
that of Parthena Graff and Mr. Steward Wyatt. 

Mabel Osburn recently attended the wedding of 
Mary Louise Dickie and Dr. J. C. Moore of Clearwater, 
Florida. The marriage took place in Bunker Hill on 
the 12th of Oct. Other I. W. C. girls in attendance 
were Velva Mann, Clara Dilling, Jesse Rook and Hazel 
Strawn. 

Mrs. Frank Nixon, formerly Ruth Hayden, now of 
Hutchinson, Kansas, is the mother of a little son, born 
in June. 

The Sept. 23rd number of the California Christian 
Advocate devotes a page to the work of and tributes to 
the memory of Mrs. C. B. Perkins. The paper tells of 
her influential work among the Japanese, and letters 
of acknowledgement were sent by representatives 
from those peoples. Mrs. Perkins was an I. W. C. 
Alumna of the Class of 1875. 

Page Twenty-five 



Ol>e College ^reelings 



Mrs. Elizabeth Dunbar Thompkins, of the class of 
1913, came from her home in Griggsville, 111., to spend 
Founder's Day at the College. 

'15. Since the formal chapel recognition the fif- 
teeners are always spoken of as the seniors of last 
year. Of them, Winifred Burmeister is in her native 
state teaching Home Economics in Buffalo, Minn. 
Other girls teaching in that department are Josephine 
Ross, in New Richmond, Minn., and Effie Theobald who 
is in White Hall, 111. 

Helen Dinsmore fills the position of German direc- 
tor in the Franklin High School, but is finding Physiol- 
ogy, History and English almost as interesting to 
teach. Irene Crum has lately taken up her work in 
the English department in Lewistown, 111., and Helena 
Munson teaches mathematics at the Chattock School 
for Boys in Quincy. Lucille Rheinbach is showing her 
great store of knowledge by teaching six different sub- 
jects in the High School at Wyanet, 111. Audrey Ber- 
ryman is enjoying the West very much and is assistant 
principal of the Scio, Oregon, High School. She also 
has charge of the German department. Feril Hess 
teaches in Round Mountain, Nevada. Mary Louise 
Powell is spending the winter, at home in Jacksonville 
and Louise Harries is in Mattoon. 



GLEE CLUB NOTES. 



The Glee Club is very fortunate in having seven 
of its members back this year. The result of the elec- 
tion is : President, May Bigger ; Secretary and Treas- 

Page Twenty-six 



T5\)t College (Brewings 



urer, Grace Lees. The try-out this year was quite a 
success. Out of the thirty-five "tryouters" thirteen 
became members, and the membership which was 
formerly sixteen, was changed to twenty. The suc- 
cessful candidates are, as follows: 

Helen Horner, Mary McGhee, Vera Teachout, 
Mary Fowler, Louise Baker, Anne Ellis, Ethel May 
Simpson, Myra Kirkpatrick, Lucille Howell, Velma 
Varney, Kittie Bunting, Lois Carpenter, Ila Allen, 
Pianist. 



THE SHORT STORY CONTEST 



January 12 has been set as the closing date of the 
Greetings Short Story Contest. A prize of $5.00 will be 
given for the best short story; $3.00 will be given as 
second prize; and a subscription to the Greetings for 
the remainder of the year, will be the third. The right 
is reserved to use at a future date, any material which 
is handed in. The right is also reserved to withhold 
the prizes if the stories submitted do not merit them. 

If you enjoy writing, grasp this opportunity of 
matching your skill with that of others and finding 
wherein you excel or are weak. As a plot or promising 
incident suggests itself to you, write it out and save it 
as possible material. Commence now to prepare your 
story and don't allow yourself to be cheated of a chance 
to enter because of lack of time when the manuscripts 
are due. 

Service Circle 

The Service Circle is following out a new line of 
work this year. The members are taking a survey of 

Page Twenty-seven 



I3lje College Greetings 



Jacksonville in regard to girls between the ages of 
fifteen and twenty-five. It is hoped that through this 
survey, we will find an opening for some practical social 
service work. The aim of the work planned is to make 
the life of the college girls extend over into the life of 
the city and give some definite service to the city other 
than in a financial way. 

The girls are entering the work with interest and 
enthusiasm, and are already bringing in information 
and suggestions which are being tabulated for future 
reference. |g| 

Several girls from another school ate dinner with 
I. W. C girls. Very curiously they watched the I. W. 
C. girls pass everything to Miss R— first. 
After dinner one of the visitors : 

"Is one of your girls sick?" 

I. W. C. Girl— "Why no, why?" 

Other Girl — "Oh I thought she must be, you al- 
ways pass everything to this one girl first and ask her 
if she won't have some, just as if you were trying to 
tempt her to eat something." 



Bright Boy. 

The class had just finished studying the different 
nationalities and then the teacher asked : 

"Now, children, if you were not Americans what 
would you want to be?" 

Girl — "I would be an Englishman." 

Boy — "I wouldn't. I would be a German." 

Another Boy— "Oh, I would be half nigger and 
half Jew." 

Teacher — "Why, Johnnie, that's a funny combina- 
tion. What do you want to be that way for?" 

Johnnie — "Well, a nigger is always happy when he 
has a dollar and a Jew always has one." 
Page Twenty-eight 



STYLISH APPAREL FOR YOUNG 

WOMEN 

SUITS, DRESSES, MILLINERY 
CLOAKS, WAISTS, LINGERIE 

In addition to the Newest Models in Ready=to=wear Garments 
from the Best Makers — we are showing the Correct Styles 
in CORSETS,— the Newest HOSIERY, Street and Evening 
Gloves, Dainty Neckwear, Handkerchiefs, Ribbons, Toilet 
Articles, Art Goods. 

F. J. WADDELL & COMPANY 
GIRLS, PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 

PHELPS & OSBORNE 

IS THE COLLEGE GIRL'S 
STORE 
SUITS, DRESSES, COATS, RIBBONS, LACES, AND NOTIONS 

POPULAR PRICES ALWAYS 

FASHIONABLE DRESS MAKING 
AND TAILORING 

A FULL LINE OF DRESS TRIMMINGS 
MRS. EMMA CORRINGTON 

ILLINOIS PHONE 547 241 WEBSTER AVE. 

FLORETH & COMPANY 

LEADERS IN EVERYTHING NEW IN MILLINERY 
COATS FOR LADIES, MISSES AND CHILREN 
DRESS GOODS AND SILKS 

AT LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES FOR CASH 



r ^ 



Secretary Photographer's Association of Illinois. 

Awarded Silver Medal for Home Photographer at Illinois State 
Convention, 1914 

OTTO SPEITH 

PORTRAITURE BY PHOTOGRAPHY 

SOUTHWEST COR. SQUARE 



GIRLS, PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



ROBERT H. REID 

"Photographs That Please" 

Member Photographer's Association of America 
HOCKENHULL BUILDING 



OUR PICTURES 

ARE HUNG IN THE BEST HOMES IN THE CITY 
AND COUNTY 



Mollenbrok & McCullough Studio 
WEST STATE ST. 



THE 



Big City Market 

All Kinds of Fancy 
Fruit 

CANNON BROS, 

W. StatcSt. III. Phone 1288 

WE DELIVER 



SEE 

BONANSINGA 

FOR 

Fancy Fruits 

Gonfectionery 

?2 East Side Square 



We have wondered why so many of the new girls 
have failed to heed the "tips" in the little Brown books. 
A Freshman explained this the other day. They have 
sent their little brown books home to their mothers. 



KODAK- FINISHING 

This is our SPECIALTY— You Want the BEST Results— 
Our Workmanship and Materials Give Them 

VAIL-& VAIL 

Oswald's Drug Store 71 East Side Square 



Jacksonville Candy Company 

We have just installed our New Soda Fountain, and we 
can serve everything in the confectionery line Hot or Cold 
— Also wemake all kinds of Homemade Candies and guarantee 
them under the pure food law. 

We have the very best electric Piano at our store. 
57 E. SIDE SQUARE B. J. GEANETOS, Prop. 

BOTH PHONES 566 



The Home of Good Things to Eat 

Walker's 
Grocery 

Homemade 

BREAD, CAKES, COOKIES 

SALAD DRESSING, Etc. 



205 East Morgan 



Both Phones 



W. E. Boston 

DEALER IN GROCERIES AND 
MEAT 



600 EAST COLLEGE AVENUE 
Both Phones 100 



GIRLS, PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



Ideal Bread 

is Better; 
so are the cakes 



DORWART'S CASH 
MARKET 

ALL KINDS OF FRESH AND 

SALT MEATS, FISH, POULTRY 

ETC. Both Phones 196 

230 WEST STATE STREET 




VISIT 

JEWELRY STORE 

WE HAVE A FULL LINE OF COLLEGE JEWELRY 

Also Good-looking and Good-wearing Goods. 
Will Be Pleased to Show Them. 



GO TO THE 

RUSSELL & LYON 

JEWELRY STORE 

FOR THE BEST REPAIRING OF 
ALL KINDS 



E.W.BASSETT 

COLLEGE JEWELRY 
DIE STATIONERY 
ENGRAVED CARDS 
SILVER AND GLASS 
ART POTTERY 
NOVELTIES 
No. 21 SOUTH SIDE SQUARE 



Comforting. 

M. B., entering room — Did you mention my name 
or what are you laughing at ? 

M. H. reassuringly — Oh, no, we were laughing at 
another funny thing. 

M. A. In Chaucer Class: The Reve was a chol- 
eric man — which means he had colic. 



BRADY BROS. 

EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 
House Furnishings and Paints 
45-47 SOUTH SIDE SQUARE 



GAY'S 



RELIABLE 



HARDWARE 



THAT OUR HOME-MADE CANDIES ARE MADE TO PLEASE 

YOU 

That you can get what you want like you want it here in the 

way of SUNDAES, SODAS, and all kinds of HOT DRINKS 

JUST PHONE 70— WE DELIVER. 

Sttulleitix $ Ifamiltou 

216 East State Street 



LATEST STYLES IN 
FALL & WINTER MILLINERY 

Fisk Hats a Specialty 



Mrs. M. O'Neil 

206 East State Street 



H. J. & L. M. SMITH 

Millinery 
Needlecraft, Corsets 



S. Side Square 



It was his first visit to the city. As he stood on 
the curbstone shaking his sides with laughter, he was 
asked : 

"What's the fun, sir?" 

"Fun ! Can't you see ? Just look how that thing 
(pointing to a watering wagon) leaks. Why, the idiot 
won't have a drop left when he gets home." 



L. C. & R. E. HENRY 
DEALERS IN FINE MILLINERY 



Always Something New and 

Up-to-Date 

238 South Side Square 




CLOAXS. SU iTS^ 

jACKSONViLLC. Au 

Low Prices and Square Dealings 
Keep Us Busy 



FOR THOSE WHO DISCRIMINATE 

We simply suggest that it has taken our constant effort to please the 
students who come to our city. We select only the BEST materials and 
and prepare them with skillful, loving care. 

PURE CANDIES, HOT AND COLD SODA, BRICK ICE CREAM 

AND PLAIN AND DECORATED BIRTHDAY CAKES. 
Telephone 227 ALL PACKAGES DELIVERED 

JOHN W. MERRIGAN 

227 WEST STATE STREET 



CJ.DEPPE&CO. 

Known for "Ready-toWear" and 
Popular Priced Dry Goods 



KUM-RITE-I N 
Let Us Show You the Most Complete 
Line of Silk Hosiery, Silk Gloves, 
American Lady Corsets, Kid Gloves, 
Fancy Neckwear, Laces, Ribbons 
and Trimmings. 



DRY GOODS STORE 



E. B. — "Why, Reba, what are you boiling that 
brush for?" 

R. G.— "Well, I've killed the bacteria but there 
might be spores still alive." 

E. B. — "Oh ! you smart people in dietetics." 



H Safest Place to Trade £1 
ILLERBY' jj 

DRY GOODS STORE 

PHONES 309 



J FURS 
SWEATERS 
HOSIERY 



LADIES 

FRANK BYRNS, 



HAT STORE 



Cafe 



Confectionery 



peacock 3nn 



Catering 



Soda 



Candies 



PIEPENBRING'S 

VARIETY STORE 

ONE BLOCK EAST OF COLLEGE 
CANDIES, CAKES, COOKIES, 
PIES, SANDWICHES, 
POP ON ICE, GROCERIES 
CALIFORNIA FRUITS 
SCHOOL SUPPLIES 



"The Home of the Crispette" 

The Sanitary Pop-corn 
and Crispette Shop 



Pop-corn That Melts in Your 
Mouth 

Roasted and Salted Peanuts 

EAST STATE ST. 



The Illinois Legislature has passed a remarkable 
bill, providing for the return to Louisiana of a silk ban- 
ner made for Andrew Jackson, in order that it may be 
seen by the young ladies who made it in 1882, and their 
ancestors. 

M. D. — "When they have seen it, will it be sent 
back?" 



And Annex for Ladies. 
221=223 EAST STATE STREET 

Illinois Phone 308 Bell Phone 57 



Wedding 
Reception 
Banquets 
Luncheons 
^S?SJ^^^ Musicals 

Theater Parties 




55^a5»S=i2r'- 



^^5> Gard Glubs 



Special attention to all College functions 

VICKERY'S 

Jacksonville, 111. 



5V 

a* 

JOSEPH HEINL & SONS 



Want 

Cut flowers 

FROM 



Both Phones 



GRAND OPERA HOUSE 

Harold J. Johnson, Mgr. 



High ClasS'Vaudeville & Pictures 

4-Piece Orchestra Afternoon 

and Evening 

A BIG Special Feature Every Monday 

PRICES 5 and 10c 



SCOTT'S THEATRE 



ALWAYS THE 
LATEST AND 
BEST IN 
MOTION 
PICTURES 



Heard in the library — "Who took the Green 
Knight out last night?" 



HARRY HOFMANN FLORAL CO. 

Designs, Cut Flowers 

Plants 

SOUTHWEST COR. SQUARE 



Greenhouse South Diamond Street 

Store: Bell Phone 154—111. 182 
Greenhouse, Bell 775 



We Pipe Your House for Gas 
GAS 

OR WIRE IT FOR 

ELECTRICITY 

AT COST 

Jacksonville Ry & Light Co. 

TWO YEARS TO PAY 224 S. MAIN 



J. F\ BROWN 

MUSIC HOUSE 



Musical 
Merchandise 



Talking 
Machines 



Sheet Music 
19 S. Side Square, Jacksonville 




Jacksonville s Foremost Store for 

Men 
And Specialties for Women 

Knitted Silk Coats 

Sweater Coats, Student Caps 

Manish Rain Coats and Hats 

Trunks and Hand Bags 



REAL ENJOYMENT 

The kind that lasts and is pleas- 
ant to recall — 
in one of our fine rigs, or help 
her arrange a Hay Ride Party. 
Phone us for Carriages for any 
occasion 

EITHER PHONE 850 

CHERRY'S LIVERY 



Seraphina — "It's very hard to get a faculty to 
chaperon. They all seem to have work.'" 

A Freshman — "Never mind, get a Senior. They 
are just as good. If you can get a Senior you don't 
need any faculty at all." 



loover 



&Sk 



reve 



Have a Complete Line of Drugs, 
Kodaks, Perfumes 

Stationery and Holiday Gifts 

We Do Developing and Printing 
East & West Side Sq. 



We Welcome You as a Student 
after Knowledge 



Pleased to have you call on your 
down town trips 



Badger Drug Store 



235 E. State St. 



Illinois 57 



Everything for the Home 



Everything for the Home 



Andre Sc Andre 



Student Headquarters 
for Room Furnishings 



The Best Goods for the Price, No Matter What the Price. 




The 
Gift 
Store 



Andre (2b Andre 



The 
Gift 
Store 



DRUGS BOOKS 

City Drug and Book 

Store 

J. A. OBERMEYER & SON 

S. Side Square 

Give Us a Call 

Bell 457 III inois 572 

College Suplies Pennants 



ALDEN BROWN 

314 W. STATE ST. 

Pictures Artist 

Frames Materials 



HAIRDRESSER. 

Artistic hairdressing, Shampooing, Manicuring, Facial 
Massage. Treatment of the Hair and Scalp, my specialty 

Will call by appointment. 
MRS. JOHN R. DUNN Residence 640 S. Prairie St. 

Illinois Phone 1194. 



All the faculty, students and friends 
of the College should have a checking 
or savings acount with 

F. G. Farrell & Co- 
bankers 

F. E. Farrell President 

E. E. Crabtree V. President 

H. H. Potter Cashier 

M. W. Osborne Ass't Cash. 



Pacific Motel 

Jacksonville, 111. 
Jacksonville's Best Hotel 



70 ROOMS 



S. M. CAMPBELL, Manager 




COLLEGEJWTWEAR 

Large assortment of Foot- 
wear for every occasion. 

Dress, Street and Bed-Room 
Footwear. 

HOPPERS 

WE REPAIR SHOES 



MATHIS, KAMM & SHIBE 

SAY 

This is just to remind you that 
we can suply any and all of 
your FOOTWEAR needs. 



CITY STEAM 

Cleaning and Dyeing Works 

208 E. State 

E. A. SCHOEDSACEK, Proprietor 



Party Dresses, Kid Gloves 

Sliippers a Specialty 



GIRLS, PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



STYLE + QUALITY + FINE SHOE MAKING 



THE GYPSY BOOT 
WILL BE THE 
LEADING STYLE 
THIS FALL 




WE HAVE THEM 

IN 

BRONZE KID 

BLUE KID 

NAT KID 



•VSHOE 



Complete Line of Evening Slippers 

J AS. McGINNIS «& CO. 



COLLEGE GIRLS: 

See our Motor Coats, Mackinaws and Sweaters 
Manito Hosiery. Also Ladies' Holeproof Hosiery 

LUKEMAN BROS. 

GIRLS, PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



Cj)e &per* jBlattonal Jlanfe 

Established 1852 



CAPITAL 

$200,000 

SURPLUS 
$50,000 

DEPOSITS 

$2,000,000 




UNITED STATES 
DEPOSITORY 

POSTAL SAVINGS 
DEPOSITORY 

MEMBER OF 

FEDERAL 

RESERVE BANK 



LADIES' DEPARTMENT 
We have provided a Special Department for Ladies with a window 
for their exclusive use in transacting their business, also a Ladies' writ- 
ing room adjoinng, daintily furnished, which is at their disposal. 

OFFICERS 
M. F. Dunlap President O. F. Buffe Cashier 

Andrew Russel V. President H. C. Clement Asst. Cashier 
Chas. B. Graff V. President W. G. Goebel Asst. Cashier 
H. J. Rodgers V. President H. K. Chenowith Ast. Cashier 
Arthur Vannier Ast. Cashier 

DIRECTORS 

Owen P. Thompson George Dietrick 

E. F. Goltra H. M. Capps 

John W. Leach O. F. Buffe 

Andrew Rusael M. F. Dunlap 



Society Programs and Menus 
THE ROACH PRESS 

ILLINOIS PHONE 236 OPPOSITE POST OFFICE 

Our Customers Say: 'The Service is a little better." 



LENG. MAGILL 

FOR PRINTING 

PROGRAMS, INVITATIONS 
PERSONAL CARDS, ETC. 

No. 227 EAST STATE STREET 
Illinois Phone 418 

Our Motto: "Not how cheap, but how 
good." 



JOB PRINTING OF ALL KINDS 

JOHN K. LONG 

Engraved Cards and Invitations 
Programs and Stationery 



213 WEST MORGAN STREET 
ILINOIS PHONE 400 



GIRLS, PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



Bl)<t <Bra$ l)ic T^rts 
Concern 



PRINTERS 
PUBLISHERS 
STATIONERS 
Engraved Cards 
Artistic Programs 
for Special Occasions 



I.M.BUNCE&CO 



PRINTING 



OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 



Plain China for Decorating 



Dr. GEORGE E. STACY 

SOUTH-EAST CORNER PUBLIC SQ. 

(Over Hppers) 

Sees Patients by Appointment at 
Office and Elsewhere 



OFFICE HOURS 11:00 to 1:; 2 to 4. 

TELEPHONES: Bell 435-Illinois 1335 

and (home) 1334 



Dr. ALBYN LINCOLN ADAMS 

OCULIST AND AURIST 

To the State School for the Blind 

323 WEST STATE STREET 



Practice Limited to Diseases of the 
EYE, EAR, NOSE & THROAT 
Both Telephones 



ALPHA B. APPLEBEE 

DENTIST 
326 WEST STATE STREET 



Dr. AUSTIN C. KINQSLEY 

DENTIST 

409 AYERS BANK BUILDING 

Both Phones 760 



GIRLS, PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



S.S.KRESGECO. 

5 and 10c STORE 



A POPULAR PLACE for COLLEGE 
GIRLS 



Jhe&npotiim 



212-214 E. State St. 



Cloaks, Suits, Furs 
and Millinery 

At Prices That Are Right 



W"-:- 

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Wmm 


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IJ^^-r^-'An-'-'- 




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• '■ pp 


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flHIw- 




E883S5^*A^i-;5:»SS& 


fc»V»A^:$i^Nc«*^ 







Music Hall 
Erected 1906 



Main Building 
Erected 1850 



Extension 
Erected 1902 



Harker Hall 
Erected 1909 



ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEGE 



College of Liberal Arts 
College of Music 
School of Fine Arts 
School of Expression 
School of Home Economics 
A Standard College 

Regular college and academy courses leading to 
Bachelor's degree. Pre-eminently a Christian 
college with every facility for thorough work. 
Located in the Middle West, in a beautiful, dig- 
nified, old college town, noted for its literary 
and music atmosphere. 

Let us have names of your friends who are 
looking for a good college. 

Call or address, Registrar, 

ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEGE 

Jacksonville, Illinois 







3 0112 105817677 



NO! 

No sun-— no moon ! 
No morn— no noon — 
No dawn— no dusk — no proper time of day- 
No sky— no earthly view- 
No distance looking blue- 
No road— no street— no "t'other side the way"- 

* * * * * * * * * * 

No warmth, no cheerfulness, no healthful ease, 

No comfortable feel in any member — 

No shade, no shine, no butterflies, no bees, 

No fruits, no flowers, no leaves, no birds, 

November! 

Thomas Hood. 



f